Activate Your AncestryDNA Test



Do you have questions about your where you come from? If yes, you can find the answer with the Ancestry DNA test. This new DNA testing service that utilizes some of the latest autosomal testing technology to revolutionize the way you discover your family history. This service utilises advanced DNA science to predict your genetic ethnicity and help you find new family connections. If you want to put an end to your curiosity, you will need to go directly to the Ancestry DNA Activate page to activate your test.

Follow these steps to activate your AncestryDNA test:

1. Visit https://www.ancestry.com/dna/activate.

2. Sign in with your Ancestry account. If you don’t have an account, you can create a free account.

3. Then enter your activation code and click NEXT. You can find the activation code (15 alternating letters and numbers) printed on your tube. Don’t enter hyphens.


4. Complete the activation form – Enter the First and Last Name DNA sample; Select the Birth Year from the next-down menu; Select the Gender; Read and accept Terms and Conditions.

5. Read their Informed Consent – Participation is voluntary, maybe change on anytime, and will not affect the participant’s results.

6. Review the information you’ve entered and click ACTIVATE KIT.

7.  You will receive an email notification once you have activated your DNA kit. After you get this confirmation message, you can check its status at any time by going to the DNA tab and selecting “Your DNA Results Summary.”

About the company:

Ancestry.com LLC is a privately held Internet company based in Lehi, Utah, United States. The largest for-profit genealogy company in the world, it operates a network of genealogical and historical record websites focused on the United States and nine foreign countries. As of June 2014, the company provided access to approximately 16 billion historical records and had over 2 million paying subscribers. User-generated content tallies to more than 70 million family trees, and subscribers have added more than 200 million photographs, scanned documents, and written stories.